City of North Platte
City of North Platte
City of North Platte
City of North Platte
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City of North Platte: Miscellaneous Information: Emergency Basic Information

North Platte/Lincoln County Emergency Management

Dan Guenthner, Director

715 S. Jeffers

North Platte, NE 69101

Phone: 308-532-7383

Email: Dan Guenthner


The North Platte/Lincoln County Emergency Management Agency is the local office of the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) which is charged by state statute to reduce the vulnerabilities of the people and communities to the damage, injury and loss of life and property resulting from natural, technological or man-made disasters and emergencies.


NEMA also functions as the State Administrative Agency for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. The emphasis is on maintaining an effective system focusing on pre-disaster and post-disaster programs to develop an effective emergency response system across the state.


NEMA has relied extensively on and utilized the local emergency management programs in Nebraska’s counties to facilitate the carrying out of homeland security activities and programs on a statewide basis.


For more information contact:

Nebraska Emergency Management Agency (NEMA)

1300 Military Road

Lincoln, NE 68508-1090

(402)471-7421

Fax:(402)471-7433



City of North Platte: Miscellaneous Information: Emergency Management Facebook

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Lincoln County Emergency Management is on Facebook Icon Facebook


For more information contact:

Dan Guenther, Director
Lincoln County Emergency Management
715 S Jeffers ST
North Platte NE 69101
308-532-7383



City of North Platte: Miscellaneous Information: Evacuation Routes

Emergency Management Evacuation Routes Map

The Lincoln County Emergency Management Office has provided a map of Evacuation Routes for the City of North Platte.


PDF Icon City of North Platte Evacuation Route Map


For more information contact:

Dan Guenther, Director
Lincoln County Emergency Management
715 S Jeffers ST
North Platte NE 69101
308-532-7383



City of North Platte: Miscellaneous Information: Disaster Information

Disaster Information

When an Emergency Happens:


Remember the EAS (Emergency Alert System)


The Emergency Alert System is a method to notify the public. Selected radio and television stations throughout your county or area serve as EAS stations. Emergency officials can activate the system to relay warnings and vital information to the public about what emergency actions to take.


Emergency information will be repeated over these stations until the "all clear" message has been given. The EAS will explain the emergency response level and will tell you what you should do (shelter-in-place or evacuate).


NOAA Weather Radio can and will be used to broadcast emergency public information, not only for weather, but for other civil emergencies as well. These inexpensive radios are the best device for staying abreast of developing conditions, short of having your television or commercial radios turned on 24 hours a day.


What to Say to Children


Traumatic events can have a powerful impact on children. Graphic images of natural disasters and terrorist activities can result in children feeling that their safety is threatened. When there is an interruption in the natural flow of life, a child can experience anxiety and fear. These are normal reactions.


Be calm and reassure children that they are safe. Children take their emotional cues from the significant adults in their lives. Explain that other important adults in their lives are safe and that these are only temporary events that can be overcome. Explain that the government, firefighters, police, doctors, and the military are helping people who are hurt and are working to ensure that no further tragedies occur.


Let children know its all right to feel upset. Listen to what children tell you about their fears, and don't dismiss these fears. Listen when children tell about how they feel and what they think of what has happened. Encourage the children to talk about these feelings and help put them into perspective. Encourage your child’s physical, creative and artistic avenues of expression at this time.


Observe a child's emotional state. Depending on their age, children may not express their concerns verbally. Children who at first hold back fear or grief may experience delayed stress symptoms later, such as reverting to outgrown childish behavior, sleeplessness, anxiety, nightmares, or even depression. These behaviors are only signs of the child's anxiety, and your acceptance will reassure the child and shorten the duration of such behaviors. Children respond to praise, and parents should make a deliberate effort not to focus on the child's immature behavior. Have them engage in "normal" activities, school, play, etc. as much as possible.


Neighbors Helping Neighbors


Working with neighbors can save lives and property. Meet with your neighbors to plan how the neighborhood could work together after a disaster until help arrives. If you're a member of a neighborhood organization, such as a home association or crime watch group, introduce disaster preparedness as a new activity. Know your neighbors' special skills (e.g., medical, technical) and consider how you could help neighbors who have special needs, such as disabled and elderly persons. Make plans for childcare in case parents can't get home.



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